Please evaluate two of the following:

Any New York Times blog, or several–take a look at several before you begin, at least. Does it seem like they have a consistent style or corporate method? How much leeway do official Times blogger seem to have? [You might find it interesting to compare and contrast these questions with the behaviors of the huge stable of bloggers that annarbor.com is currently employing, although this comparison is a bit unfair since the two organizations have such different budgets/audiences/experience/resources.]

Whitehouse.gov–our government is blogging! How authoritative and/or reliable do you find this blog? Would you read it for actual news, or do you see the content as spin?

Drudge Report / Daily Kos–I’m providing a “conservative” and a “liberal” option for this choice so you can evaluate the way the blog is framing and distributing information without being completely absorbed by how much you hate the angle they give content, if you do.

Gladwell.com–So, there are certainly still pieces of longer journalism. Gladwell is an example of a reporter/essayist who supplements his published work (mostly in the New Yorker) with a blog that allows for comment on, and sometimes expansion or revision of the ideas his long essays address. Sometimes I feel like this is great–information is fluid and dynamic, and why should it be constrained by the limitations of print? Other times I feel overwhelmed by the fact that I not only need to keep up with Gladwell’s articles, I need to keep up with the continuing discussion of the articles–the meta-material as well. What do you think? (I highly recommend reading one of his articles–“Underdogs” which is currently on his front page is fascinating, especially for you sports fans.)

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